Context Graph

In the lead-up to the London all hands we had a Town Hall where Mark Mayo and Nick Nguyen previewed the three year strategy for Firefox.  That talk mostly covered an emerging area of focus and investment we’re calling the Context Graph.

This last week, Nick posted a vision for the Context Graph over at Medium. If you haven’t, I encourage you to go read it at medium.com/@osunick

So what is the Context Graph. The context graph is an understanding of how pages on the web are connected to each other and to a user’s current context. With Context Graph, we’re going to build a recommendation engine for the Web and features that help people discover relevant content outside of the popular search and social silos.

What does that look like in practice? Well, if you’re learning about how to do something new, like bike repair, our recommender features should help you learn bike repair based on others who have already taken the same journey on the Web. If you’re on YouTube watching a music video, Firefox should help you find the top lyrics or commentary sites that embed or link to that YouTube video. Or, if you’re walking into a WalMart, our mobile apps should automatically show you WalMart’s website or perhaps a WalMart deals and coupons site.

Building a recommendation engine for thew Web is a large project that will take time and effort but we believe the payoff for users and the health of the Open Web is going to be well worth it.

To dig deeper, I highly recommend Nick’s post at medium.com/@osunick and check out the wiki page at wiki.mozilla.org/Context_Graph.

2 thoughts on “Context Graph

  1. It sounds like Context Graph is Mozilla’s attempt at disrupting (in a Clayton Christensen sense ) search and social.

    Somehow, I doubt yet another recommendation engine (something Google, Apple and Facebook already have a mature offerings in) will do that.

    I also have doubts on Mozilla’s ability to build a useful recommendation system leveraging Firefox’s installed base.

    This is another Firefox OS: Mozilla doesn’t have the resources to make this constitutive and it’s too late to jump on this even if they did.

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